Think you might be Pregnant?

Even before you miss a period, you may suspect that you’re pregnant. For some women, early symptoms of pregnancy begin in the first few weeks after conception.

Pregnancy symptoms can also vary in their intensity, frequency and duration. The following early signs and symptoms of pregnancy checklist are only a guideline. Many early pregnancy symptoms can appear similar to routine pre-menstrual discomforts.

Symptoms of Pregnancy: The Classic Clues

Tender, swollen breasts: Early in pregnancy hormonal changes might make your breasts sensitive and sore. The discomfort will likely decrease after a few weeks as your body adjusts to hormonal changes.

Fatigue also ranks high among early symptoms of pregnancy. During early pregnancy, levels of the hormone progesterone soar — which might make you feel sleepy.

Nausea with or without vomiting. Morning sickness, which can strike at any time of the day or night, often begins one month after you become pregnant. However, some women feel nausea earlier and some never experience it. The cause of nausea during pregnancy isn’t clear, pregnancy hormones likely play a role.

Light spotting: Sometimes a small amount of light spotting is one of the first signs of pregnancy known as implantation bleeding, it happens when the fertilized egg attaches to the lining of the uterus — about 10 to 14 days after conception. Implantation bleeding occurs around the time of a menstrual period. However, not all women have it.Picture1

Headaches: Early in pregnancy, increased blood circulation caused by hormonal changes may trigger frequent, mild headaches.

Constipation: Hormonal changes cause your digestive system to slow down, which can lead to constipation.

Increased urination: You might find yourself urinating more often than usual. The amount of blood in your body increases during pregnancy, causing your kidneys to process extra fluid that ends up in your bladder.

 Mood swings: The flood of hormones in your body in early pregnancy can make you unusually emotional and weepy. Mood swings also are common, especially in the first trimester.

Cramping: Some women experience mild uterine cramping early in pregnancy.Picture2

Cravings: When you’re pregnant, you might find yourself turning up your nose at certain foods, such as coffee or fried foods. Food cravings are common too. Like most other symptoms of pregnancy, these food preferences can be chalked up to hormonal changes.

 

Missed Period: Perhaps the most obvious early symptom of pregnancy is when you’ve missed your period. This possible sign of pregnancy is often what causes women to search for more details about the other pregnancy symptoms.

Picture3

Some women might only experience a much lighter period compared to their usual. You might not experience any of the pregnancy signs listed below until around the time you notice you’ve missed your monthly cycle.

Unfortunately, these symptoms aren’t unique to pregnancy. Some can indicate that you’re getting sick or that your period is about to start. Likewise, you can be pregnant without experiencing any of these symptoms.

Still, if you miss a period and notice some of the above signs or symptoms, take a home pregnancy test or see your health care provider.

 

Author

Ms. Leshani Samaradiwakara is a recent graduate with a BA in Economics and a minor in Psychology and Sociology. She is currently working as a Business Entrepreneur in MAS Holdings. In her role as a Business Entrepreneur, she explores new trends in the apparel industry, studies the consumer behavior and conducts market research, especially in the area of women health & wellness. She is a enthusiastic individual who is interested in discovering new places, traveling the world, exploring new cultures and meeting new people.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s